3 Reasons Why Your Music Could Be Rejected For Radio Airplay

What may have stopped you getting that big break on the radio are fairly vast and will need you to be very open minded about what might have caused this issue. Here are three of the main reasons why your music could be rejected by a radio station.

For anyone who has tried to get music played on the radio – national, global or local - and failed, you know just how difficult that feeling can be. The feeling of rejection is always a hard one to take especially as an artist, so it’s important that you look at why you were rejected instead of just wallowing in the decision – taking the time to look into why this happened, and how you can fix the problem, is going to be vital for the long-term success of your career.

 

What Could Be The Problem?

What may have stopped you getting that big break on the radio are fairly vast and will need you to be very open minded about what might have caused this issue. Here are three of the main reasons why your music could be rejected by a radio station:

 

  • You don’t fit the genre – not every radio station is happy to play anything and everything. Many are specific about a small listing of genres that they will be happy to play. As an artist, you will know what your songs are like and what genre they would typically fall under so you will have more success if you try and target a radio station that fits your actual genre. If you aren’t sure what to class your music as, it might need a bit more work! Definition is very important when it comes to radio airplay.

 

  • A poor quality of production – too much interference in the background, low quality equipment etc. are common problems for those who want to get heard. A radio station won’t play some half-fuzzy, low quality recording that you send in; it’s worth spending a few hundred bucks to call out a studio and let professionals make your song sound the best that it can. A high quality music production is so vital to get your own music played on the radio that you do need to consider it.

 

  • A lack of introduction technique can kill your chance for success. These are professionals that you are speaking too and they get an absolutely ridiculous amount of offers every week – you need to stand out, and to do this you need to be able to put together a good introduction letter to get yourself noticed in the first place. Describe yourself, your music and your overall commitment to being involved within the music industry – but do it in a simple way, don’t give them some big college essay! If you make yourself sound distinctive and fresh, they are more likely to actually put your CD into the player and see what they think of you.

 

Bonus tips: To fit within commercial pop radio standards, the chorus should not be later than one minute into the song, and if the intro is longer than ten seconds you need to have a look at the structure of the song. Your song shouldn't exceed 3.30 min.

 

Also, try small, local radio stations or college radio and don't shoot for the big guns. Those are normally a closed door for artists without major label support or a professional song plugger. However, gaining recognition through smaller stations might open the door for the right support to get into major stations.

The SongCat Team
About the Author
The SongCat Team

We believe in supporting artists of all levels of their musical journey, from the 40-year music business veteran, to the burgeoning songwriter who are looking to polish their craft. We also believe that creating professional, high quality, and expertly mixed recordings shouldn’t be limited to high budget record deals.

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