6 Do's and Don’ts When Pitching a Song

Like most serious songwriters who are looking for their big break, you’ve probably sought opportunities to pitch your songs to accomplished acts. From trying to get your foot in the door via your cousin who works at the café frequented by Adam Levine, to hobnobbing with countless bigwigs who are close to an artist you are interested in, you have probably tried all the ways to land a pitch.

Like most serious songwriters who are looking for their big break, you’ve probably sought opportunities to pitch your songs to accomplished acts. From trying to get your foot in the door via your cousin who works at the café frequented by Adam Levine, to hobnobbing with countless bigwigs who are close to an artist you are interested in, you have probably tried all the ways to land a pitch.

Whatever the case, making your pitch impactful is highly important in order to maximize your chances of success. Let’s look at some dos and don’ts when pitching to an established artist.

  • Do ensure your song is within the artist’s vocal range

No matter how much your song’s lyrics resonate with an artist, they won’t take it on if they can’t sing it. Be sure to spend some time listening to the artist sing to ensure the song you wrote is not out of their vocal capacity.

  • Do present a high quality recording

Getting a chance to pitch your song to an artist or his team can be hard work to begin with, so don’t blow the chance of your song being accepted by not having a high quality demo of the song you’re pitching.

  • Do pitch a song that does not mimic the artist’s catalogue

He or she is already familiar with their own catalogue, so pitch a song that is fresh and different from anything the artist has ever done but is still within their genre or music style.

  • Don’t pitch songs that do not fit the artist’s brand

Established artists work hard to develop a brand that fans can identify with. You will certainly get turned down if you pitch a song that doesn’t suit their style of music or way of life. Plus, it shows that you didn’t do your research.

  • Don’t pitch songs that are mediocre

If you don’t have a good song on hand to pitch, it’s better to ask for a rain check if you got the opportunity to pitch to an artist. Pitching a sub-standard song will most likely turn off the artist and his team and ruin your chances of pitching to him in the future, even if your new songs are fabulous.

  • Don’t assume your song is the next big thing

While you should be confident, assuming that the song you’re pitching is number 1 quality without having it reviewed could lead to sore disappointment. Have friends and colleagues listen to it and give their honest opinions first before attempting to pitch it to an artist.

Learning the art of pitching your songs could determine how far you reach in the music business, so follow these dos and don’ts to help you along the way. Good luck!

The SongCat Team
About the Author
The SongCat Team

We believe in supporting artists of all levels of their musical journey, from the 40-year music business veteran, to the burgeoning songwriter who are looking to polish their craft. We also believe that creating professional, high quality, and expertly mixed recordings shouldn’t be limited to high budget record deals.

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