Singer and Band Demo: A Musician’s Voice Goes Far Beyond Vocals

You have a voice and you want to be heard. A musician’s voice goes far beyond vocals. Your voice is how you express who you are, whether that is through your mouth, your strings, your keys, or your snares.

You have a voice and you want to be heard. A musician’s voice goes far beyond vocals. Your voice is how you express who you are, whether that is through your mouth, your strings, your keys, or your snares.  As an artist, musicians harness and distribute their voice in order to share their vision and their art for others to enjoy. While some musicians are content with singing in coffee shops, open mics, or busking, there are others that are ready to have their voice heard by a larger audience. The decision to expand your musical reach comes with different challenges and tasks: Regular band practice, possible management, and probably most critical of all, creating a demo or song.


The demo is the lynchpin to most obstacles facing musicians with growth and mass audience expansion on their mind.  With expanding and rapidly advancing technology on their side, musicians are no longer forced to cram into a small garage and record their song on a small cassette tape and hope for the best. A new era in technology can lead to higher quality songs and faster distribution, but there is much more than just technology to consider when undertaking this all-important step into having your voice heard and expanding your audience. Promoters, club managers, clients, and label executives sometimes utilize demos to choose who they work with, so understanding and defining your song goals is critical. Here are some important things to consider when creating your demo:


Collaboration is Key: “Teamwork makes the dream work.” Sure, it’s a cheesy pretence, but it is true.  One of the most tried and true ways to have your song heard is to get it into the hands of other musicians you respect and have an established audience.

Know WHO Your Audience is: This seems so basic, but it is frequently overlooked. Who is your audience?  Who are you similar to?  How do you differentiate yourself? What audience will you resonate with? These questions are critical when creating your demo. Making your voice and your song accessible to your audience while still remaining true to your voice is the hallmark of a great artist.

Mix Appropriately Again: Gone are the days where cassette tapes are distributed for demos.  The technology exists to create high quality demos and recordings, and services such as professional mixing and mastering makes a high quality and professional song that will impress as well as remain true to your voice.

Do YOU Enjoy it? Also often overlooked, but crucial in the creation of a quality song: Do you like what you hear? Is your voice there? Is the reason you got into music being honored by this demo? Would you sit and listen to this if you were in your own home? 


Your voice is ready to be heard, and your demo or song is the next step in that journey. Understand who you are, who you want to hear you, and how you want to be heard – and then?  Just play.

The SongCat Team
About the Author
The SongCat Team

We believe in supporting artists of all levels of their musical journey, from the 40-year music business veteran, to the burgeoning songwriter who are looking to polish their craft. We also believe that creating professional, high quality, and expertly mixed recordings shouldn’t be limited to high budget record deals.

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